CONDO ARCHIVES

Managing Condo Corporation Employees

May 2018

A smoothly running condominium corporation results in happy, satisfied and content residents.

Condominium corporations require employees to function.  Building management, security, cleaning, landscaping and maintenance staff are all part of a smoothly running condominium corporation.

Some employees work for the corporation while others are employed through contractual arrangements.

It is the condominium manager’s job to ensure the corporation is running smoothly and everyone is doing their job.  They are expected to provide guidance and training to employees, and handle disputes that arise.  Effective employee management is not possible if board members and residents inject themselves into the process by getting involved with service requests or providing direction to employees.

When this happens the entire system can break down.  When more than one individual provides direction it disrupts schedules or change priorities.  Crucial services may not be delivered when required.  There may be no way to track and monitor service requests.  An employee fails to get their job done.

In a condo building any problem, complaint, compliment or concern should go through the management office.  Should the system fail in some respect the problem can then be tracked, responsibility determined and corrective action taken.

There is a liability concern when individuals receive favourable treatment by circumventing the management office and making arrangements with employees or contractors.  Liability is greater when the individual doing the circumventing  is a director.

The most common management mistakes when dealing with employees relate to communication – most frequently a lack of it.

Good employee management requires connecting with employees on a regular basis.  Employees should receive both positive feedback and corrective comments when performance is inadequate.  Managers should never speak about employees to other employees or residents.

Management expectations of employees should be clear.  Employees should know what tasks are expected of them, how they are evaluated and how to respond to residents.  Employees should understand that following directives from residents or the board is inappropriate and can lead to termination.

Another communication failure is providing limited information.  When employees understand the big picture, and how their tasks relate, they can be more effective.

When the system works and employees do what is expected of them, the condo corporation operates more smoothly and residents are happier.